How to Build a DIY Cornhole Scoreboard

DIY Cornhole Scoreboard

Earlier this month I’ve built a set of Cornhole Boards and my wife made the Bag for the game. As an addition to this set, I’ve built a DIY Cornhole Scoreboard that matches to colors of cornhole boards. When playing a game it’s always nice to keep a score on a board. This makes the game more enjoyable that you don’t have to worry about remembering the score in your head.

This scoreboard is large enough for everyone to see the score far away. It also has two cup holders in the back to keep your drinks and large sturdy legs to prevent it from tipping over.

If you need a complete set of rules for the game you could find it on my cornhole boards page. Below are the rules for keeping the score of the game.

Scoring

The score shall be taken after all cornhole bags have been thrown for a round.

  • 3 points for a cornhole bag that goes through the hole.
  • 1 point for a cornhole bag that is on the playing surface.
  • 1 point for a cornhole bag that is hanging into the hole.
  • 1 point for a cornhole bag that is hanging off the edge. If a cornhole bag is on the front of the board, the board can be lifted. If the bag stays on the board, point counts.
  • 1 point for a cornhole bag when there is a simultaneous hit (board and ground) and it stays on the board when the board is lifted from the ground.
  • 0 points for a cornhole bag that is on the ground.
  • The team with the highest round score, adds the difference of the two scores to their game score. (Cancellation Format scoring).
  • The team who wins the round is given honors to throw first in the next round.
  • If both cornhole teams have the same round score then the game score stays the same and honors stays with the team who had it the previous round.

You also might be interested in the other game projects that I’ve built: DIY Pucket GameDIY Mancala Board Game, and Triangle Peg Game.

DIY Cornhole Scoreboard

Time to Complete

4 hours

Total Cost

$25

Skill Level

Intermediate


Cornhole Scoreboard PDF

$7.97

This PDF download includes Cut Diagrams, a List of Supplies, and 3D illustrations with detailed steps to build the project. Measurements are in imperial and not metric. Does NOT include SketchUp/CAD files.

The plans are embedded on the webpage for free, but if you would like to support the website, you can pay a small fee to purchase the printable PDFs.

Thank you for your support!

Cornhole Scoreboard

If you are feeling generous today, you could give a small tip to help me create more projects. Thank you!

Note: Lumber dimensions are listed as nominal size.  See lumber sizes for actual dimensions vs nominal.

Disclosure: Some of the links on this page as well as links in “tools for this project” and “material list” sections are affiliate links. 


Dimensions

DIY Cornhole Scoreboard dimensions

Step 1 – Measure and Cut 1×12 Board for the Scoreboard

Take 1×12 board and cut it to 54” in length using a miter saw.

board for DIY Cornhole Scoreboard

Step 2 – Cut Arch Corners on the Main Board

To make the rounded corners on the board, place a metal paint can (quart size) on the corner of the 1×12 board and trace the bottom arch of the can with a pencil. Do this on all four sides of the board, then cut the corners using a jig saw following the pencil mark. Using a random orbital sander, sand the front, the back of the board and corners to remove any rough edges.

board for DIY Cornhole Scoreboard
drawing arch for DIY Cornhole Scoreboard
arch drawn for DIY Cornhole Scoreboard
sanding board for DIY Cornhole Scoreboard

Step 3 – Measure and Drill Scoreboard Holes for the Pins

Measure 2 3/4″ from the right and left side of the board and draw two parallel lines from top to bottom. Starting from the bottom of the board, measure and mark 8 ½” on the line. This is where the first hole will be drilled for the pin. From 8 ½” measurement, measure, and mark every 2” on the line for the remaining holes going up the board. There should be 22 marks on each line, so a total of 44 marks on both lines. Using 3/8” drill bit, drill all of the holes on both lines. Since I didn’t have a drill press at the time of the project, I used Dowelmax as a guide to drill the holes straight. But it’s really not that important to have the holes straight

DIY Cornhole Scoreboard hole measurements
drilling holes for pins on the DIY Cornhole Scoreboard
board with holes for DIY Cornhole Scoreboard

Step 4 – Cut Legs for Scoreboard

Using 2×6 board, cut two pieces at 30” in length. Then measure 1” from the bottom of the leg and cut off the edges at 35 degrees, see picture. Find the center of the leg and cut a ¾” wide by 3” deep notch using a Miter Saw. Do this for both of the legs. Drill two pocket holes for 1 1/4″ Pocket hole screws on each side of the notch. After the main scoreboard is stained and painted it will be inserted into the ¾” x 3” notch and secured with 1 ¼” pocket hole screws.

base for the DIY Cornhole Scoreboard
DIY Cornhole Scoreboard base boards
Drawing a measurement for notch cut out
Notch cut out for DIY Cornhole Scoreboard base
Drilling pocket holes for DIY Cornhole Scoreboard base

Step 5 – Cut Boards for Cup Holder

From the remaining 1×12 piece, cut two boards to 8” in length. One board will be used for the bottom of the cup holder and the other for the top. Take the top board and draw two 4” circles using a compass. Drill a hole on the inside of the circle. Then insert a jig saw blade and cut out both of 4” circles. Drill two pocket hole on both the upper and lower cup holder board for 1 ¼” pocket hole screws.

cup holder boards for DIY Cornhole Scoreboard
drawing cup holder circles for DIY Cornhole Scoreboard
cup holder board for DIY Cornhole Scoreboard

Step 6 – Make Pins for Keeping Score

Take ¾” board and drill two round discs using a 1 3/4″ Hole Saw Bit without the drill bit. In the center of the disc drill a 3/8” hole, but do not go all the way thru. Then take 3/8” wooden dowel rod and cut two pieces to 2” in length. Dip the dowel into the wood glue and insert it in the hole. Wipe off any extra glue and let it dry. Sand the discs with sandpaper to remove any rough edges. Also, sand the 3/8” dowel rod so that it could be easily inserted in and out from the scoreboard.

pin head and pin for DIY Cornhole Scoreboard
pin heads for DIY Cornhole Scoreboard
pins for DIY Cornhole Scoreboard

Step 7 – Paint and Stain the Scoreboard

To match the cornhole boards that I’ve built earlier I used the same method to paint/stain the scoreboard. First, stain the scoreboard using Jacobean stain, then use a Chalked Country Gray paint to lightly brush over the stain using a brush. See the cornhole boards page for more details. The center of the scoreboard will be painted with Chalked Country Gray from the top to the bottom. Cover the stain with painters tape leaving a strip in the center to be painted. After paining the board, slide the scoreboard inside the notch of the legs and screw in 1 1/4″ pocket hole screws.

DIY Cornhole Scoreboard stained and painted
tape section of DIY Cornhole Scoreboard to be painted
paining the base of the DIY Cornhole Scoreboard
Cornhole scoreboard base

Step 8 – Assemble Cup Holder at the Bottom of the Scoreboard

On the backside of the board place the bottom 8×11 1/4″ board on the 2×6 legs and attach it with a nail gun to the legs. Then place the second 8×11 1/4″ board 3″ above the bottom board and screw in with 1 1/4″ pocket hole screws. Cut and insert 2″x3″ pieces between the upper and the lower cup holder board at each corner and attach it using Nail Gun.

cup holder base for DIY Cornhole Scoreboard
cup holder for scoreboard
base and cup holder for DIY Cornhole Scoreboard

Step 9 – Stick Adhesive Numbers

Once the scoreboard is completely assembled stick 1″ Self Stick Numbers on the front of the scoreboard in the painted area. Measure 8″ from the bottom of the board and stick number 0. Then stick the remaining number so that they are 1″ apart. You’re done with this DIY cornhole scoreboard. Have fun!

DIY Cornhole Scoreboard
DIY Cornhole Scoreboard

3 thoughts on “How to Build a DIY Cornhole Scoreboard”

  1. I think it would be a slight improvement to weight the bottom and then have the cupholder further up so you don’t need to bend all the way down to the ground to set your drink down. Very nice design, though.

    Reply

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